Leaf-Fall and some Autumn Colour

Frosted crabapple leaf 3765
Frost enhances the orange-red leaves of a crab apple.

It doesn’t get very cold in this part of Suffolk in Autumn, so the leaves tend to get blown away before they have a chance to develop much colour. (Yet a few miles away, where it gets chillier, there have been great clouds of yellow leaves.)

However, in the last couple of weeks, the night-time temperature has got cold enough to encourage a bit of colour here and there. You have to look quite hard for it, but it can be found.

Frosted leaves-3780
Blackberry leaves become a mix of heat and frost.

Our recent frost helped to make the last of the leaves more interesting to photograph, providing a crisp, icy contrast to the warm tones of the leaves. It was a good time to be out early to take some pictures.

While I was wandering around with my camera, I noticed soft noises that at first sounded as if there were birds hopping around nearby.

But when I looked up, I realised that I was hearing the leaves falling in the neighbours’ garden. It gets the sun before ours does, and as the frost melted, the leaf-stalks were losing their last grip on the trees and shrubs and dropping softly to the ground. Somehow, the tiny sounds made the morning feel even more hushed and peaceful.

Red Leaves-2-up
The frost has melted, but being wet makes these geranium and cotoneaster leaves all the more red.

The leaves will soon be gone and everything will seem bare and wintry. But, just for this last little while, these few are rich and glowing with beautiful warm tones – a sight to seek out and enjoy.

By the time you read this, we will have had another frosty morning here. More of the leaves will have fallen and I will have been out taking more photographs.

Frosted Weigela Leaf-3719-B
Autumn has slightly lightened and warmed the tones of these weigela leaves.

29 thoughts on “Leaf-Fall and some Autumn Colour

      1. I was beginning to worry about frostbite, LOL! (And family who still live up in Scotland would probably say something along the lines of, ‘Don’t be so soft!’.)

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    1. Thank you Syd! It’s great to wake up to a frosty morning and know that you have something to photograph. There’s not a lot else at this time of year!

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      1. Thanks Laurel! I was very glad to see the frost ‘cos it’s getting hard to find photographs as the garden dies back. And we had another, much harder, frost since then… πŸ™‚

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  1. All of the photos are lovely, but I’m most fond of the frosted leaves. It’s such a beautiful effect; I hope we have a bit of frost here this year, so I can try to capture it myself. You’re right about those ‘tiny sounds,’ too. They seem to deepen the silence when they can be heard.

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    1. Thank you – I love the frosted leaves too. πŸ™‚ It’s very peaceful when you’re out taking photos on such a cold morning – feels as if you have your world to yourself for just a little while…

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  2. Leaves laced with frost look idyllic. As I read this much later than you published it, much of Britain is being lashed by gales and deluged by heavy rain once more. Beautiful frosted leaves on a crisp autumn day seem so far away.

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    1. I know exactly what you mean, Jill! It’s very wet and windy here in Suffolk too and feels like winter has arrived. (But it was frosty before dawn.)

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