Cornflowers – And Blog Love Part 2

This is a continuation of last week’s post, responding to being given a ‘Liebster Award’ by Liz at Exploring Colour. Thank you Liz, you’re very kind!

In last week’s post I answered Liz’s questions. This week I get to give 11 facts about myself and then think of 11 questions for the bloggers that I nominate. Let’s get started:

1. I was brought up in the most northerly county of mainland Scotland – Caithness. It’s the sort of place where everyone knows everyone else. (And what they get up to.) My husband (Colin) is from there too.

2. My family lived in a house pretty much in the middle of nowhere, in a wild and windswept landscape. Today I prefer to live somewhere much less isolated!

3I went to a primary school with only around 30 pupils – we didn’t get away with much!

4My parents met at the Isle of Man TT races, where Dad was taking part. Years later, he started a business selling and repairing motorbikes. I have some very happy memories of zipping along Caithness roads on my own motorbike. (I suppose you could say that I owe my existence to motorbikes, hehe!)

5. It wasn’t until I came south of Caithness as a student, that I came across really beautiful gardens. (Caithness is just too windy!) I fell in love with the lovely botanic garden belonging to the University of Aberdeen and I’ve never really recovered…

6. I love live theatre. Living near Edinburgh for many years meant that I was lucky enough to be able to see lots of Edinburgh Fringe performances and to frequently go to the city’s theatres. (That’s something I miss here.)

7. I had a short outdoor theatre piece performed as part of a promenade drama created for of the 100-year anniversary celebrations for the Forth Rail Bridge. It was a lot of fun – and work!

8. Colin and I love to spend our time off going for long walks beside the sea or meandering along the Norfolk Broads (inland waterways) in a boat. (If money was no object, we’d love a little boat.)

9. My favourite flowers are clematis.

10. One of my interests is printmaking – most recently I’ve been learning drypoint. (Read about it here.) Next I’d like to learn collagraphy.

11Mixed-media art fascinates me and I’d like to find ways of combining my various creative interests. (Watch this space!)

Flower of Centaurea montana

I’ve previously nominated several of my favourite bloggers for an award, so for the Liebster Award I’ve nominated bloggers who write about gardening and nature. I’m sure you’ll enjoy their writing just as much as I do. They are:

Robyn Haynes at Big Dreams for a Tiny Garden

Heyjude at Cornwall in Colours

Invitation to the Garden

Judith at Beyond the Window Box

The Tiny Potager

Weeds Roots & Leaves

Please don’t feel obligated to take part, but if you do, it will be fun to read your answers!

These are the instructions for taking part in the Liebster Award:

  • Thank the blogger who nominated you and give a link to the blog.
  • Answer the 11 questions given to you
  • Share 11 facts about yourself
  • Nominate between 5-11 other bloggers
  • Ask your nominees 11 questions
  • Notify your nominees once you’ve uploaded your post

Now for my (mostly garden-themed) questions:

  1. Did you grow plants as a child?
  2. If you could grow anything (no problems with climate etc.), what would it be?
  3. What’s your favourite plant or flower?
  4. What gives you the most pleasure to grow?
  5. Is there any plant that you’ve regretted growing?
  6. When it’s safe to travel again, where would you most like to go?
  7. What’s your happiest childhood memory?
  8. What animal would you most like to have as a pet? (If absolutely anything was possible…fantasy time!)
  9. What would you like to learn to do, if money and other practicalities weren’t a problem?
  10. If you could teach your children (or the young folk around you if you don’t have children) one thing that they would always remember, what would it be?
  11. If you could have the most wonderful day ever, how would you spend it?

So this week has been a bit different – I hope you’ve found it entertaining. And to anyone who does take part – thank you!

Centaurea monbtana 5494

Camassias: And Some Blog Love (1)

My favourite thing about blogging is the friendly community that you can become a part of. At a time when it’s impossible to visit my friends locally, the relationships I’ve formed with bloggers from all over the world are deeply valued.

So it was a welcome surprise to find that I’d been nominated for a ‘Liebster Award’ by my lovely friend Liz at Exploring Colour. (You’ll find that Liz’s blog is a wonderful mix of life-enhancing colour and fascinating articles, many tackling issues that are important to the natural world.)

Now you may be wondering just what the ‘Liebster’ (German for ‘favourite’ or ‘dearest’) Award is. It’s a means to allow readers to discover new blogs and by the recipients nominating more blogs, lots of bloggers have a chance to be found. (A sort of bloggers-helping-other-bloggers chain letter!)

Liz had eleven questions for her nominees, which I’ll answer here. The following part, where I can tell you eleven (probably random) facts about myself will be kept for next week’s post. (Along with my own questions for the bloggers I nominate.) This post might get awfully long otherwise!

Let’s get down to the questions:

1. What connection (if any) do you feel that you have with New Zealand? Not a direct one, but through my husband, Colin. Colin has a cousin named Madeline who lives there and came over to Scotland to meet everyone. I remember a family boat trip along Loch Ness (no sign of Nessie) and a huge party afterwards.

2. What place in this world do you most love? My garden – a close runner-up is Argyll, on the west coast of Scotland because it’s so beautiful.

3. Your favourite colour(s) are what? And what do you associate with the colour? Blue and purple. I think of blue skies, my hubbie’s lovely blue eyes and blue and purple flowers.

4. What connection do you feel/experience with nature? I’ve always felt a strong connection to nature. I was brought up in a house surrounded by open countryside with only one other house in view. That tends to make you aware of every living thing around you and of the weather, the seasons, the amazing skies and sunsets…there weren’t many other distractions in those days. As a keen gardener, the connection to the garden and its plants and the many little creatures that live there is extremely important to me. I believe that it is vital for us to remember that we are ourselves a part of nature.

5. Your favourite ‘active’ recreational activity…? Is walking along the country paths here. And best of all is walking around gardens that we’re visiting!

6. Your favourite ‘quiet’ hobby/interest? If you read this blog regularly, you’ll guess…gardening!

7. Is there something you enjoy ‘having a go at’ regardless of skill? Drawing – it’s something I’ve been trying to learn to do better over the last couple of years because it is so useful for printmaking.

8. What was (or is) your favourite children’s book? ‘The Starlight Barking’ by Dodie Smith. (The sequel to ‘The Hundred and One Dalmations’.)

9. Your current or past ‘occupation’ i.e. work/study/keeping busy..is what? When I lived near Edinburgh, I used to write for magazines and newspapers. That was mainly about incidents from Scottish local history, but also work for my local newspaper. I wanted to improve my photography to be able to use it to illustrate my magazine articles, so I went back to college to study HND Photography. Now the photography has taken over…

10. What’s your favourite creative activity…what do you have a passion for? Photography! My parents gave me a Kodak ‘Instamatic’ when I was eleven and that started me on a lifetime of taking photographs. Photographing flowers is my passion and a great way to blend my favourite activities.

11. Is there something you can share about a challenge you face, or have faced? The biggest challenge I’ve faced has been dealing with my mother’s dementia. I suppose we were lucky, in that it didn’t get really bad until the last couple of years of her life. Mum was almost 92 when she died, and she’d had a very full and happy life up until the time her health started to fail in her late 80s. But dementia is a dreadful way for a life to end. You lose everything – your home and interests, your relationships with family and friends, and even a large part of yourself because you forget so much of your life. Mercifully, Mum was looked after by lovely, caring people and she always remembered who I was and found my presence reassuring. (It doesn’t always go like that.)

Wow! This is a much longer post than usual! So thank you for making it this far and thank you Liz, for the questions!

Flower of Camassia leichtlinlii
Seen a little closer…

Something to Read: More Favourite Blogs.

The scale of changes since this time last year is something I’m still struggling to take in. But, despite everything that Covid 19 is doing to us, spring is coming, growth is beginning, and flowers are blooming.

At a time when most of us expect to be enjoying the outdoors, we’re having to occupy ourselves indoors. So this may be a good time to share more of the blogs I enjoy reading.

Last week’s post with my recommendations for WordPress blogs didn’t allow space for all of my favourites (some of which are not on WP). If you have time to fill, I hope you’ll find some of these enjoyable. They are all art and creative-themed blogs, which I find both engaging and inspiring.

The first two blogs I want to mention have similar themes of artists’ books, textile art, and print. Stephanie Redfern shares her richly-layered work which combines a number of elements including fabric collage and her very delicate pieces of porcelain. Scroll down to the middle of her second post on ‘Books’ and you’ll see the beautiful pages Stephanie created with porcelain ginkgo biloba leaves and moths, along with her own poem.

The work of Annwyn Dean appeals to me greatly because it combines printmaking and artist’s books with great detail and delicacy. I had hoped to see Annywn’s work at the Turn the Page Artists’ Book Fair in Norwich in May – well, maybe next year!

I also find Stephanie Devaux Textus a most enjoyable blog to look at. (It’s written in french, but it is mostly photographs and Google translate takes care of what text there is.) It’s a lovely mix of book art, calligraphy and some textile art – worth a look!

There’s plenty of good reading, as well as beautiful mixed-media and textile art art on Rachael Singleton’s ‘Folio and Fibre’  (Scroll down the page and you’ll see her ‘Mussel House’ – a piece with the most delicious colours and textures.)

My final recommendation is a bit different to the others because it’s mostly about painting. But it also has a lot to say about every aspect of creativity and it’s one of the most helpful and inspiring sites I’ve ever come across – Nicholas Wilton’s ‘Art2Life’ blog. As a photographer, I’ve found what Nick has to say very useful and you never know, maybe I’ll actually try painting some day. (He runs courses for artists but is very generous with the free teaching he gives through Facebook and through his blog.)

I hope that you’ll find something interesting amongst the blogs here that will keep you entertained for a while. Stay home and stay safe!

The Joys of Blogging: And a Thank-You

This week I had a very welcome surprise when I discovered that Liz at Exploring Colour  had included me in her list of ‘Blogger Recognition Awards’. I’m delighted, because the friendships I’ve made through blogging mean a lot to me and it’s lovely to feel that I’ve been accepted as part of this community. So thank you Liz!

I started this blog not quite two years ago, in the hope that it would help me get back to my photography after a few years of being distracted from it. (If you’d like, you can read more about the story behind my blog in my very first post .) It has worked well for that, because I have to get on and take photos for my posts. But there’s been a side to blogging that I hadn’t expected – the warm and encouraging community.

In appreciation for the enjoyment and camaraderie of the blogging world, I’d like to pass on the award to some of my favourite blogs.

Along with Liz, there are several bloggers that I met in the early months of my blog. Shelly at Love is Stronger writes with great kindness and compassion but one of my favourites on her blog is her delightful cartoon slugs. (And that’s coming from a keen gardener!)

I’ve been reading Digital Lady Syd’s Fun Photoshop Blog for a long time before I started my own blog and I’ve learned a lot about Photoshop and other photo-editing programs from her. There’s a huge amount of very generously given expertise on this blog, so I can recommend it to anyone who wants to learn how to make the most of their photographs.

At the moment, while we’re all having to stay close to home for the sake of everyone’s health, it’s nice to be able to see other places through blogs. I enjoy Jill Slawit’s sharing of the Yorkshire countryside on Where There’s a Jill There’s a Way and this woodland walk feels like an escape from present worries about the coronavirus. This is a great time to explore the world through the blogosphere!

Travel further afield features in Petra Koster’s blog. You can see some of her beautiful photography in this post about seeing the Northern Lights in Iceland. It’s ideal reading if you’re feeling a bit cooped-up!

You won’t be surprised that plants and gardens feature on many of my favourite blogs. Susan Rushton’s blog is a great escape for garden-lovers. Why not immerse yourself in the quirky ‘Giant Houseplant Takeover’ at Wisley in Susan’s review here. Or you can travel to Texas with Linda Leinen’s Lagniappe and perhaps take a look at the wonderful display of bluebonnets and other spring flowers – sure to lift your spirits! And the hellebores on Phao Hewitson’s ‘A Blog of Two Gardens’ are a joy to see. For inspiration and ideas for planting your garden, head over to Ali’s beautiful blog at The Mindful Gardener. Her flowers are gorgeous and you’ll end up with a huge ‘to buy’ list of plants! (I have anyway…)

It’s interesting too, to see the different wildlife that comes into gardens around the world – like the black kites in Indira’s garden on her blog, ‘My Third Eye’. There is more wonderful bird photography on Birder’s Journey – I’ve never seen anything as amazingly colourful as this little Painted Bunting.

Nature is the inspiration for Steve Gingold’s beautiful photography which you can find on his blog. If you haven’t seen it before, you really must! (And, if I’m honest, I’ll have to admit to being a bit envious of this gorgeous photograph of a trillium.)

These are just a few of the blogs that I enjoy reading. It would be easy to create an exceedingly long post with many more blogs! They’re especially important at the moment, both as a chance to see beyond the confines of my own home and as a chance to develop friendships at a time when we need to be physically isolated from those around us.

To those mentioned above – thank you for the happiness your blogs bring. Please don’t feel under any obligation to take part in these awards if you don’t want to! But do know that it is a recognition of the pleasure and friendship your blog creates. (Something so valuable right now!)

If you would like to pass on your own Blogger Recognition Awards, then these are the instructions:

  1. Thank the blogger(s) who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  2. Write a post to show your award.
  3. Give a brief story of how your blog started.
  4. Give two pieces of advice to new bloggers.
  5. Select up to fifteen bloggers you want to give this award to.
  6. Comment (or pingback) on each blog to let them know that you’ve nominated them and provide a link to the post you’ve created.

Oh yeah, I was supposed to pass on a couple of bits of advice for new bloggers – as a less than two-year-old blogger myself…hehe! In that case, I’ll say (a) just relax and be yourself, because blogging is about people in the end and (b) enjoy the company of other bloggers – comment and get involved – because that is the best part of blogging for me.

Freckled Hellebore-4869

Happy New Year! No Resolutions Here…

So it’s the time of year for looking both backwards and forwards…assessing, planning and – very probably – wondering where the hell the time went!

Do you make New Year’s resolutions? Or do you have a more relaxed way of working out what you want to do with the brand-new year? Is it really necessary to have one day of the year when you try to make commitments that are often unrealistically demanding? Or is it better to have an ongoing awareness of what you want to accomplish and how you may be able to do it?

You will have realized that I’m not too bothered about making resolutions at this time of year. But, as a keen gardener, it’s a useful opportunity to think about the work I want to do and the plants I want to grow. It’s a good time to plan seed-sowing and (especially if it’s too cold to work outside), to take a while to imagine how I’d like the garden to look throughout the year.

Garden-planning, for me, also means planning what I want to grow to photograph, and trying to come up with ideas for making areas of the garden more photogenic. (I think that may be a long process!)

Making a list of gardens to visit is one of the nicer ways of spending an hour or two on a grey January day. It promises both inspiration for my own garden and new subjects to photograph. Maybe I should make a resolution after all – to visit more gardens this summer. (It shouldn’t be too hard to keep that one!)

Garden Statues
Ever get the feeling that you’re being watched? These two seem to be just as interested in the visitors, as the visitors are in the garden!

Perhaps the most successful approach to the New Year is simply to decide what is most important and where our focus needs to be during the year. No make-it or break-it big declaration, but something calmer and more persevering. Encourage something to grow quietly month-by-month, and by the end of that year there may be something very pleasing to show for it.

No big display of resolutions, then. But this year I would like to concentrate on using my time for the things I really want to do. (Now my time is much more my own than it was, and I realize just how precious it is.)

That means spending time working on photography and gardening. It means continuing to learn printmaking and drawing skills. And just to enjoy time spent in our garden, visiting other people’s gardens and exploring the countryside. (Luckily Hubby enjoys these things too!) The ideal would be for me to be able to bring all of these things together as much as possible – something for me to work on steadily through 2019.

Of course, I hope to make this blog grow and flourish during the coming year. No resolution needed there! Thank you for reading and for your comments – it’s wonderful to be able to ‘chat’ and to feel a sense of community. (I’d like to be able to put a really big smiley face here!) I hope that you all have a very happy New Year.

Fern sculpture
Art and gardening come together: this fern-inspired sculpture seems to grow out of the water.

Exploring a New Path (and Some Resources for Learning to Draw).

When I started this blog, I mentioned wanting to get on with the things that are important to me. Specifically, I wanted to learn new art techniques that would help in my printmaking and in mixed-media work. One of those techniques was perhaps the most basic – learning to draw.

So now I am busy doing something that is entirely new for me. A few weeks ago I enrolled for a six-week natural history illustration course. (I’m now doing the work for week three.) The class is online, held by the University of Newcastle in Australia. (If it appeals to you, you can find it here. )

It was luck that drew my eye to the advert for the course and the fact that it was offered free (so long as you don’t want a certificate at the end) made me think, ‘Why not?’ A drawing course held locally would probably make me feel a bit uneasy, but online you’re pretty much anonymous, so there’s no need to feel self-conscious about any lack of drawing skills. Additionally, the course is aimed at anyone from beginner to more experienced, so I didn’t have to worry about the course being too advanced for me.

Having said that, I did find the course really hard work last week – spending hours staring at the items I’d chosen to draw and attempting to get the detail of them onto paper. I felt tired by the end but managed to get the drawings (mostly) finished and submitted. A lot of the value of doing a course like this is that it pushes you to get the work done and to commit yourself to it. (Obviously, you could back out of the course and you wouldn’t lose anything, but self-respect, and the desire to make the most of an opportunity to improve, is a good spur onward.)

Does it seem a bit strange for a photographer to want to be able to draw rather than simply taking a photograph? Well, maybe! But this will give me the freedom to be able to do printmaking without needing to rely on a photo for the basic image. (I’ve done both screen-printing with a photo-stencil and photo-lithography but now I’m learning drypoint, which really does need some ability to draw.) Even the photography should benefit, because learning to draw trains you to become more observant. Drawing a subject forces you to concentrate on it to see all the details and to fully understand its structure and gives a much better understanding of what you are looking at.

The course lists a number of useful outside resources which are available to anyone. (You could learn a lot about the basics of drawing from these, without bothering with the course.)  These YouTube videos may be worth a look if you’re interested in learning to draw or improving your drawing skills:

  • SchaeferArt – first video takes you through the basics and following videos build on drawing and painting skills.
  • Paint Academy – basic shading, hatching etc demonstrated. You can work alongside this in real time. They have a large number of painting and drawing videos – many more advanced than the one I’ve linked here.
  • Drawing & Painting – The Virtual Instructor – I found this video on ‘How to Shade Basic Forms’ the most useful of those I’ve listed. There are lots more videos from him (on both drawing and painting) here that all look worth watching  – might need quite a bit of time!
  • Digital Painting Lessons – ‘Visual Measuring’ – basics on working out angles
  • EmptyEasel – ‘How to Draw by Finding Basic Shapes Within Objects’ – simplifying a subject  to make it easier to draw.
  • Sycra – ‘Negative and Positive Space’
  • Cathy Johnson – ‘Sketching in Nature’  The sound is low at the start but she does start speaking!

This drawing course is certainly a challenge for me. When I complete it, I’d like to have enough skills to be able to continue learning on my own. It does feel exciting to do something new! I hope that if you’re interested in learning to draw, you’ll find the videos helpful. (I wish I’d realized that they existed before!)

Japanese garden
Your destination might be a surprise!

Discovering Drypoint

I’ve mentioned before that over recent years I’ve been learning printmaking techniques. My newest little adventure is to learn drypoint.

This is a process that appeals to me because it is very simple and direct. Basically, an image is scratched into a printing plate (metal, plastic or special card) with a sharp point.

The plate is printed in the same way as an etching plate but the drypoint print has a softer-looking line. (A result of the ink being held not just by the incised line but also by the raised burr pushed up by the sharp point.)

For my first attempt at drypoint, I’ve used a drawing based on this photograph:

Photograph of a passionflower
The original passionflower photograph

This is the same image that I used for the intaglio print/photography combination that I wrote about here.

The plate I used for this print was clear plastic. (You can see it in the photo below.) This has a huge advantage over metal – you can just lay it over a drawing or photograph and use that as a guide for inscribing the lines of the image. To scratch the lines into the plate, I used an engineers’ scriber. (You can find these for around £5 in D.I.Y. stores.) Anything sharp enough to mark the plate is worth trying but there are specific drypoint needles with different sizes of tips available too. I’ve recently bought a couple of these – shown in the photo. (Above the engineers’ scriber.)

Drypoint plate and needles
Drypoint plate, scriber and needles

The printing plate is inked and wiped in the same way as an etching plate. (But treated more gently, to preserve the burr along the edges of the lines – this helps to give the characteristic fuzzy look to the printed lines.)

As you can see from this description, the drypoint process is very straightforward. It’s also pretty inexpensive to try out. Even better – there are no chemicals involved. (Hooray! Great!! I’m very happy to be able to avoid using the nastier printmaking chemicals – some are very toxic!)

Making the drypoint print was a process that I really enjoyed. I found something very satisfying about scratching the lines into the plastic plate. And it’s also very pleasing to be able to use my photographs as a starting point for a printed image that will look quite different. I’m planning to make more prints soon and (if you’re interested in printmaking) I hope that I may have encouraged you to give drypoint a try.

Drypoint print of a passionflower
My first attempt at drypoint printing

A Photographer’s Garden

As both a photographer and a gardener, obviously I tend to choose plants that I think will make a good photograph. The flowers I choose are often fairly large with a complex structure or interesting markings – something to hold the interest of the viewer.

It probably won’t take you long to spot my favourites on this blog. Passionflowers, hellebores, clematis, tulips and alliums are just a few of the flowers that give me the urge to grab my camera. (And, um, a strong urge to visit garden centres too!)

Buying plants to photograph means that I’ll have plenty of subjects for pictures. But buying one each of these plants won’t add up to good garden design. Instead, if I don’t restrain my plant-hunting, I’ll end up with a very bitty-looking garden.

Of course, the remedy is simple. We’re told to plant in groups of three or five, or in drifts if we’re lucky enough to have the space. Yeah, fine! That just gets a bit expensive at the garden centre….

Luckily, lots of the plants I’ve chosen are easy to propagate or else like to spread or seed themselves about. These plants are gradually becoming the backbone of my garden and they make it look a bit more cohesive.

There’s a snag here though. (There would be!) Some plants are getting just a bit too enthusiastic. Tall red scabious are getting absolutely everywhere, the geraniums are ruthlessly trying to smother the young astrantia plants nearby, and Japanese anemones are doing their best to take over the entire garden.

It appears that this photographer’s garden is going to be a constant balancing act. (And some of the more thuggish plants will have to be forced to mind their manners. That may take quite a bit of effort on my part.)

I hope you have the chance to enjoy a garden in this wonderful weather.

My Favourite Source of Inspiration

I’ve always loved gardens. Early morning in summer is the best time in mine. It’s still peaceful then, and the demands of the day can be ignored for a little while.

Part of what makes it feel so special to me is the quality of the light at that time of day. It hasn’t yet got the bright glare that it will have later on. Instead, the light slants into the garden, picking out the textures of soft, feathery grass heads and glowing through the translucent petals of flowers. It brings a feeling of joy.

I’m certainly not an expert gardener, so it feels like a small miracle when plants grow well. (Especially if they haven’t had the care they should!) Self-seeded ”babies” are an excitement and sometimes a mystery…

sweet pea and aster flowers
Sweet peas and asters grown for a photograph

There are failures too, and there are always plenty of weeds, but somehow the garden always feels like a place of hope.

From childhood, I’ve been attracted by the look of plants. Not just for their colours, but for their textures and their structures too. (Think of the velvety petals of a petunia or of almost metallic-looking Allium christophii flowers.)

As I’ve grown older, my interest has widened to include the history of plants, the folklore, the stories told about them. (In general the relationship between man and plants. Probably because, for me, it represents the link between ourselves and nature. Because we are a part of nature too.)

There you have it – I’m a plant nut! (And always will be.) And yes, you may have found me out – photographing plants makes an excellent excuse for buying more!

clematis flower close-up
One of my favourites – a clematis

Is Dabbling Dangerous?

I’ve recently been enjoying the blog of the artist Danny Gregory. Reading through some of his older posts, I came across one from 2015 that seemed especially relevant to this blog and to my own creative process.

In the piece, entitled, ”The Dangers of Dabbling”, Danny Gregory says that although he admits to being ”a dabbler in all sorts of things”, we ought to avoid it. He tells us that we should concentrate on the work that we feel called to do, and not let ourselves be distracted by dabbling in other areas.

I do agree that if you want to be good at something, then you’ll need to focus and work hard. But does that mean that also trying out other things is necessarily bad? Can time spent on other interests bring something to your principal work? Is it possible for ”dabbling” to be a good thing?

As far as art is concerned, I believe it can be. Because it seems to me that, for mixed-media artists, experimenting and challenging yourself with new materials and methods is part of your artistic growth.

Several artists have particularly inspired me with their exciting combinations of techniques and materials.

Dorothy Simpson Krause wrote about bringing together collage, printmaking, photography and painting to create beautiful artists’ books in ”Book + Art”. (I love this book. It makes me want to try making my own artists’ books.)

Patti Roberts-Pizzuto creates delicate artworks by combining her drawings with stitching on paper, which is then dipped in beeswax. Wen Redmond also uses stitch in her work. To this she may add digital imagery, mono-printing, paint, or more, to create pieces which are wonderfully unique and expressive.

While none of these artists could be called a ”dabbler”, they do show that different techniques can be brought together in new and adventurous ways to create successful artworks.

So what about dabbling, then? Well, for me (as very much a learner) it gives the opportunity to find out what creative processes appeal to me and whether I can find a way to combine them with my photography. For artists, dabbling may provide a way to travel beyond the confines of the core work. It allows new ideas to form and new combinations to be made, which can lead to unexpected and exciting results.

There’s no doubt, if I was to stick to purely photography, then I would be that much better at it. But trying out other art forms and finding ways to use them alongside my photography may give me something that is truly ‘mine’ and expresses my own unique voice.

I’m not afraid to dabble…are you?

You can see the work of the artists I’ve mentioned here:

And Danny Gregory’s blog is here. I can thoroughly recommend it!