A Favourite Garden

I’ve mentioned before that I enjoy visiting other people’s gardens. They’re a great source of both pleasure and inspiration. One of my favourites to visit is the lovely garden created by the late Beth Chatto at Elmstead Market in Essex.

Fortunately for me, I live in the neighbouring county (Suffolk) and I’ve been able to visit the Beth Chatto Garden many times over recent years. But my first visit to the garden was much earlier, while I was still living in Scotland. At the time I was still fairly new to gardening and Mrs Chatto’s book, ‘The Green Tapestry’ had just come out. The book soon became one of my most relied-on sources of information about how to create a garden, so it was a great treat to actually be able to visit the garden that had inspired it.

Water garden at the Beth Chatto Gardens
The view as you enter the garden and look towards the ponds

As you walk into the main part of the gardens, your eye is caught by a series of four large ponds that form the impressive centrepiece of the garden. The water-garden was created to take advantage of  water coming from a natural spring and to solve the problem of what would otherwise be heavy, waterlogged ground. The results are beautiful and invite you to wander and linger or just have a seat on one of the benches and relax.

Water garden planting at the Beth Chatto Gardens
Planting along the bank of one of the ponds

It was late spring when we visited and there was new growth everywhere. The garden changes a lot with the seasons and can be dramatically different when the plants have grown to their full size later in the year. Our previous visit had been last autumn, so this felt like quite a contrast, with everything very fresh and green and full of promise for the summer.

A candelabra primula growing by the water
A candelabra primula growing by the water

Many of the plants here are familiar to me from Scottish gardens – candelabra primulas, gunnera and ferns particularly – but sadly they won’t grow well in my own very hot and dry garden. (One of the things I learned through reading Beth Chatto’s books was the importance of choosing the right plant for the situation. I’m afraid I condemned a few plants to a slow death by putting them in entirely the wrong place in my earlier gardening days!)

Arum italicum 'Pictum' echoes the shape of the fern but has a contrasting texture and markings.
Arum italicum ‘Pictum’ echoes the shape of the fern but has a contrasting texture.

The planting in the garden is a delight. I love to see the way texture and shape are contrasted (as in the photo above). Actually, I’d really like to grow Arum italicum ‘Pictum’ in my own garden because the lines on the leaves make it a great subject for black and white photographs. (The wild arum keeps popping up here, so it should do well enough.)

Looking across part of the water garden
Looking across part of the water garden

Our visit to the Beth Chatto Garden was partly prompted by wanting to get ideas for making a pond in our own garden. (OK, so our pond will be absolutely tiny in comparison, but you might as well look for inspiration from the best!) And there’s a nursery at the garden, so inspiration can easily turn into a few plants to take home with you…

Alliums and forget-me-nots in a border
Alliums and forget-me-nots in a border

Of course, there are plenty of familiar plants that I can (and do) grow, like the alliums, camassia and forget-me-nots in the border above. And then there’s the plants that I could grow when I lived in Scotland, like the rhododendron below. (Ah, now I really wish I could grow that here!)

White rhododendron
A plant I wish I could have….

The gardens have far more than I can possibly describe here. There appears to be just about any habitat that you can think of – water garden, woodland, shady areas and the sunny scree beds. And then there’s the famous gravel garden with its drought-tolerant planting – it has been a great source of inspiration for our own very dry garden. It’s a garden that I feel I can thoroughly recommend to anyone visiting this area, at any time of year. There’s a nursery and a good tearoom too, so you can easily spend a few hours here.

As you will probably know if you read gardening papers or magazines, Beth Chatto passed away in May this year, aged 94. She has been an inspiration to many and I know that a lot of my own enthusiasm for gardening has come from reading her books. I feel that her legacy is not just in the beautiful gardens that she has created, but also in the love of plants and the understanding and knowledge of them that she has shared with other gardeners.

Cercis siliquastrum (Judas tree or redbud)
A quiet spot under a beautiful Cercis siliquastrum (Judas tree or redbud)

10 thoughts on “A Favourite Garden

  1. This is such an enjoyable post to read and the photos are lovely. I particularly enjoyed the arum leaves with the ferns, and the last photo with the judas tree with bench seat underneath. Everything looks very lush. Thanks Ann!

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    1. Thank you! I’m very pleased that you enjoyed the post and it’s lovely to get your comment saying so! The garden itself is very beautiful and one of my favourite places to just be, so I really wanted that to come across. And I’d love to have a judas tree in my own garden. It was stunning!

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      1. I agree with both comments! πŸ™‚ I love ‘Forest Pansy’, especially with the light shining through it…maybe I can somehow find room for one….

        Liked by 1 person

  2. This is such a lovely post – I think we captured some of the same views, but yours in spring and mine in autumn. Makes a difference, but beautiful in all seasons I imagine. You have reminded me that I should buy Arum italicum for my garden. It grows in the lanes here so should be happy enough and like you I like the patterns on those leaves. I could grow rhodies too, but they are not one of my favourite plants. Plenty in the Cornish gardens though! Thanks for bringing this to my attention. I shall have to have a nosy around your site and see where else you have been.
    Jude xx

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    1. Thank you Jude! I really enjoyed reading your posts about this garden too, especially seeing the autumn images. I believe that the garden is now under the protection of Historic England, so its future should be secure. (But I don’t think that changes anything about the running of the garden and nursery.) We have the wild arum around the garden, being fairly thuggish. So I’m tempted by italicum, but would need to stop it from spreading too far. (Gardening is teaching me that you CAN have too much of a good thing, LOL!)

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